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Welcome to August's Newsletter

Posted on 01 August 2016
Welcome to August's Newsletter

One month on and everyone in politics, on TV and in the media has stopped talking endlessly about the European referendum. Thank goodness for that!

Unfortunately, they're now talking endlessly about Brexit — and chances are they won't stop talking about it for the next five years. Because as new PM Theresa May made clear just as she was about to move into her new home, Number 10 Downing Street, “Brexit means Brexit — and we're going to make a success of it!” Which is a much better message to send than, “Brexit means Brexit — and we're going to make a hash of it!”

In the main, landlords seem to be sanguine about the EU result. For one thing, as the Sunday Times pointed out, it may mean fewer rules with a “potential question mark over, for example, the EU ban on letting homes with poor energy efficiency, due to start in 2018.” It's not yet clear what will happen to Brits who own properties abroad, mind you — and depending on which newspaper you read, house prices are either tumbling or rising, post-referendum. Either way, buckle up, property watchers. This Brexit thing could be quite an interesting ride...

Point of view

You've seen a property you like, and you've arranged to view it.

Just remember: there are a number of things to do when you view.

For starters, check the outside as well as the inside for evidence of damp or cracks in the plaster or walls. Another tip is to makes sure that all the taps, light switches and windows are in good working order; and it doesn't hurt to check behind paintings and under furniture and rugs to see if they are hiding any nasty surprises, such as damp or woodworm.

Plus, use a viewing as an opportunity to find out what items are staying put, and what will be going when the owners move. Impressed by that superb Aga in the kitchen or that massive shed in the garden, for instance? Then don't simply presume they will be there when the owners move out.

Don't limit yourself to just one viewing, either. Come back a few times and at different periods of the day so you can get a real feel for the property and understand more about how light and noise affect it.
Finally, if you have any questions about the property or the area in which it is situated, make sure you ask your estate agent.